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Why Isn’t Kratom On Social Media?

Kratom on social media

Search for kratom on social media platforms. In a world engrossed by influencer marketing and point-and-click transactions, you’ll find shockingly few accounts related to kratom products or kratom vendors. And NO, it’s not because people don’t know or care about kratom—the plant is more mainstream than ever before.

So why isn’t kratom on social media, seemingly at all?

Answer: Kratom businesses are not allowed to promote kratom like they would other products. The FDA often sends warning letters to kratom companies that do not follow certain marketing limitations. Social media platforms are largely privately owned and able to restrict the content found on their sites. And because kratom is not approved by the FDA and already has a number of these marketing restrictions in place, social media giants have decided to over-police kratom businesses.

Kratom Marketing Restrictions (And How This Writer Feels About Them)

What are these marketing restrictions, specifically? As a kratom writer, I am not allowed to:

  • Suggest to consumers how much kratom to ingest, per dose or otherwise. All kratom dosage-related questions should be directed to the American Kratom Association (AKA) or your physician. I believe this is the most harmful kratom marketing restriction because educated companies like Kratom Spot should be allowed to make dosage suggestions to new users and beyond!
  • Publish medicinal claims about kratom as point-of-fact. For example, kratom companies cannot say “this cures x-y-z” in order to sell kratom. Medical claims must be proven using scientific research before being used in kratom marketing. This one gets a pass in my book—no medical claims should ever be made regarding a substance without proof.
  • Publish therapeutic or homeopathic claims about kratom. The marketing restrictions around this point are looser than they were in the past. In fact, kratom businesses have become more vocal about the potential benefits of kratom without making factual medicinal claims. This is good news! Kratom has worked for a variety of ailments, conditions, and beyond. As kratom companies, should we not be allowed to publicize these ailments, perhaps connecting the suffering to the solution?

Back To Kratom Social Media Blackouts…

Kratom companies often report having their accounts flagged, suspended, or shut down entirely, often without notice of wrongdoing. Plus, we’re not only talking about businesses here. Kratom advocacy groups, kratom-related news pages, and even kratom users with a penchant for posting have seen their accounts suspended.

This is a huge mistake.

The U.S. often touts itself as the “land of the free”, a place where freedom of information is akin to a basic human right. We even have a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) for god’s sake—how much more do I need to drive this point home?

But if social media platforms decide that kratom NEWS or kratom ADVOCACY does not belong, is that not counterintuitive to a better, more educated future? How can social media sites decide what is “appropriate” information when thousands of intelligent people use kratom in the U.S. every day! Not to mention the quality of news that is allowed to stay on these social media platforms—let’s not even go there.

If just marketing kratom wasn’t allowed or just selling kratom wasn’t allowed, we’d understand. No, really! Social media platforms are more enjoyable when you’re NOT being marketed to. However, when these platforms begin to restrict the promotion of scientific information or critical kratom-related news (and the resulting conversations), it becomes a social (media) dilemma.

Where Does Kratom’s Social Media Future Go From Here?

The American Kratom Association (AKA)—perhaps the most important kratom advocacy and legal group in the world—recently launched successful social media profiles without suspension. This is a step in the right direction, as the AKA is the premiere source for kratom information, laws, advocacy, and recommendations. As the AKA gains more presence on social media platforms, kratom will too!

What do you think about the censorship of kratom on social media platforms and marketing, in general? Let us know in the comments! Also, make sure to follow the AKA on all of their socials so we can get kratom to the front page everywhere: